Misguided Peach Bloom for Halloween

I’ve never had a fruit tree bloom quite like this before!  Doesn’t it know that apples and pumpkins get to be the star now?  It has just really started to cool down here in southern California.  I can almost guarantee that this bloom will fizzle before it bears fruit, but it’s an interesting site in the garden.

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The potted pink mandevilla next to the outdoor fireplace it definitely more sure of itself and I’m happy to report that it’s creeping along the mantel quite nicely, situating itself in the cracks of the stones.

DSCN2572I decided that with my lackluster fruit tree growth this year, I would adopt a technique that I used for the Spice Zee Nectaplum when I planted it this spring and it did fab.  When I planted it, I also planted a two foot long plastic pipe found in the hardware center plumbing section.  I use it to give water directly to the roots deep in this hard, dry soil.  So, I picked up 6 more and carefully dug holes around my already planted fruit trees and positioned them down in the ground.  I also drilled about 4-5 holes in the lower half of the pipe to give water all around.

DSCN2576Here’s to a fruitful 2015.

 

 

Summer Beauty

I’ve allowed the Cinnamon Basil to flower because darn it if I can’t bring myself to pinch those lovely purple flower stems.

An enticing pumpkin flower beckoning the sun and the bugs.  Look closely and you can see a baby pumpkin peeking out in the lower left corner.

Love. The plant, the berry, the colors.

Pole green beans

Lemon cukes hanging out on a lazy Friday morn.

Mandevilla. This year I took a stab at growing it for the first time and I’m a fan. The secret? Fertilizer. It likes to dry out between watering, too. Here is graces the hen hang out around their coop, adding some soft lines and color to the dirt digs.

All 5 girls are broody. They just sit in here. All. Day.

Sighs from the absence of delicious eggs aside, I’ve come to accept, even feel relief when broodiness ascends upon my Silkies.  It gives them a break from so much production (an egg a day for each hen) and it gives me a break as well from overlooking while they’re out and quieting morning squawking.

I don’t try to break them, dip them in ice baths or isolate in a cage.  I wait the few weeks for them to finish their cycle and start laying again on their own.  No stress.  I let nature do it’s thing.  That is, after all, why I have them in the first place.  To live a bit closer to nature and to go with the ebb and flow.  Have a good, calm, natural life, sweet hens.